Online Roulette FAQ - Part 2

Roulette FAQ Part 1These set of roulette questions cover everything from the latest 3D roulette online to the age-old questions covering "la partage" and the unkillable Martingale betting system. This article discusses roulette wheel manufacturers, casino software designers, and the subject of biased wheels. Blackjack writer John Patrick also makes an appearance.

We also answers questions about famous roulette players of the near-past, tips on roulette etiquette, and even a short discussion of money management. I duck a question asking for my recommendation on my favorite online casino, while giving a ready guide to finding the best casino for your gaming needs. I also touch on a few gambling glossary questions, while discussing a bit of the history of roulette. Let's start with a general question on Internet gambling for real money.

This page answers the following questions about roulette games;

You can view other roulette questions and answers in Part 1 - Part 2 - Part 4

Roulette Questions Answered

What is the best online roulette site?

I won't tout any specific casino website, because no site is the best for everyone. What you should look for is an online casino which is licensed, regulated, and legal to play in your jurisdiction. When I say legal, I mean you should check to see if it is legal to gamble in the local, state, provincial, federal, and/or national jurisdictions where your ip address is found (We have state pages for US players - see New Jersey, Delaware, Colorado, Nevada).  Next, check to see if a site is legit, so it has internationally recognized licensing. Once you've jumped these hurdles, make sure the casino's roulette software is compatible with your computer's operating system. This is especially important if you use a Mac, Linux, or other non-Microsoft Windows operating system. In these cases, most sites have a free non-download instant play version which should work with Mac or Linux OS's, but check first. You can also read our casino reviews.

Roulette players are lucky in this regard, because the game's odds don't change from one casino to the next. Make sure the site you play at has European roulette, then find out which sites in your area offer either la partage or imprisonment rules on their European roulette. If you can find all this, you'll be able to play roulette with a 1.35% house edge, which is about as good as you can expect. Don't play anything but the 50/50 bets (red/black, odd/even, high/low), or else the house edge increases to 2.7%. Only once you've made sure casinos fit all these criteria should you look at signup bonuses, player rewards, graphics, and gameplay. Find the site which is legalized for your country and province which has the best rewards and bonuses and has a good reputation, and this will be the best online roulette site for you.

What is the German bet in roulette?

The German bet is the "zero spiel" or jeu zero wager. This bet is called the zero-play because it involves the numbers closest to 0 on the wheel: 12, 35, 3, 26, 0, 32, 1. In truth, four of the numbers are on one side of the zero, while two are on the other side, because the wheel is divided into specific wheel sectors in French roulette and these are seven central numbers in the voisins du zero sector. This is a popular wager in Germany.

What's the latest news with Ashley Revell?

For those new to roulette, Ashley Revell was a UK man who sold everything he owned in the world, took the money, and bet it on one spin of the roulette wheel in Las Vegas. When this happened back in 2004, Ashley Revell became a bit of a celebrity in the United Kingdom. A UK bookmaker helps Ashley Revell get his bankroll up to $135,000, while SkyNews was on hand at the Plaza Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas to film the event. When the time came to make the wager (April 2004), Mr. Revell placed his chips on red. The bet came up red-7 and the (then) 32 year old Ashley Revell doubled his money up to $270,000. With these winnings, he opened a gambling website called PokerUTD, which is still online. The incident has inspired British pop culture since, as Simon Cowell based his 2011 show "Red or Black?" on Revell's wager.

Why is roulette called "The King of Casino Games"?

Roulette is associated with Monte Carlo, which has a lot of prestige in the gambling world. That's probably why roulette is called "The King". In truth, you could make the case for a lot of other games being considered for the title. Texas hold'em is the most popular game with the gambling masses. Slot machines bring in 70% of revenues. Blackjack and video poker have better odds from a gambler's perspective. Gambling is a hobby with a lot of slang and a lot of colorful nicknames and "King of Casino Games" happens to be one of roulette's monikers. It's also called the Devil's Game, because the numbers 1 through 36 add up to 666.

Which system is better: Roulette Sniper or Roulette Killer?

The better question might be: which system is worse? Both of these systems make the same type of extravagant claims with fake testimonials and dubious no-risk or moneyback guarantees. Neither can get around the fact you'll be playing against a 2.70% house edge in European roulette--and worse in the American game. I recently took a look at the "betting systems" message board at one of my favorite roulette forums. Interspersed between the questions on the Baden-Baden System or the Roulette Reaper system is (both listed) were ads for several payday loans, which should tell you what kind of easy targets the payday loan people think the desperate roulette system gambler is. Avoid the systems, which are not mathematical.

Why does roulette in California use cards instead of pockets?

When roulette was legalized in California in 2004, the state law stipulated cards had to be used to determine the outcome of the game and not the usual slots or pockets.

What's considered good roulette etiquette?

A few examples of courtesy should suffice. Players are given about a minute to make wagers after bets are paid on the previous spin. Even once the ball is sent spinning, you have a few seconds to make a decision, but don't make a wager after the croupier calls out "No More Bets". Also, once the dealer puts the dealer marker on the winning number, don't touch your chips, whether you won or lost. The dealer will collect all losing wagers, then pay the winning players. Whether you win or lose, be considerate to the dealers. If you win, be sure to tip them nicely. Finally, give other players their space. Nobody likes to be jostled or have their personal space invaded, so keep to yourself. Observe these manners and you should do just fine.

What is a "trio" in European roulette?

The trio bet is one of two possible 3-number wagers involving the 0 in European roulette. You could make a 0-1-2 or a 0-2-3 trio bet. In either case, you would place your chips at the "T" of the intersection between the three numbers involved.

When should I walk away from the roulette table?

Decide on a bankroll. When you lose that amount, walk away from the table. This is what's called a "loss limit". Next, set a realistic amount you would like to win. If you hit that amount, walk away from the table. This is called a "win goal". Stick with your loss limit and win goal categorically, under all circumstances. Otherwise, if you have a session go so long that you start to get hungry, feel like you need to go to the restroom, start to lose concentration, or fear your ride home may be leaving, walk away from the table. Money management and biological needs are all you need to know when to leave a roulette table.

I've seen plenty of advice for betting after a loss. What's a good tip for betting when you're on a winning streak?

Don't worry about it. No two bets in roulette are connected. Don't increase your bets when you think you're more likely to win, because no such thing exists in roulette. It's all in your head.

The discussion about betting after wins and losses always fascinates me. It seems to be human nature to believe the law of averages affects singular sessions of gambling, because the betting system type advice are the most-asked questions in the business. Roulette players will enjoy their casino visits a whole lot better as soon as they stop worrying about beating the system, accept roulette is unbeatable (except through luck), and enjoy the entertainment value of a spin of the wheel.

Is 3D roulette available online?

Gamblers can play 3D roulette at casinos powered by Net Entertainment, Rival Gaming, TopGame Technology, and BetSoft. Microgaming is now in the 3D casino business, having signed a deal with Sheriff Gaming out of Alderney. So yes, plenty of 3D roulette exists online.

Are "la partage" rules good or bad for me?

La partage rules are very good. La partage is similar to en prison rules, in that it halves the house edge of the game you're playing. In game play, these rules simplify how it's achieved from the imprisonment process, which requires the bet to stay on the table an extra hand. When your playing a 1:1 or 50/50 bet like the high/low, odd/even, or black/red and the result is 0, under la partage rules, you lose only half your bet. This lowers the house edge from 2.7% to 1.35% in the European version of roulette, where the rules are most often applied.

How often are roulette wheels biased?

We don't know the accurate answer to that question, but I'd say the attention to detail modern casinos pay to their equipment makes it fairly rare. Biased wheels still happen. For example, Spanish gambler Gonzalo-Garcia Perez decide the wheels in Spanish casinos were flawed and they should yield skewed results. He analyzed their results, found a pattern, and beat Spanish gambling operations out of about 600,000 Euros before it was over. The casinos sued to get their money back, but the courts told the casinos they should fix their wheels. When a case like this happens, though, it puts the fear in other casinos and assures they'll check their equipment extra closely.

John Patrick has three books on Amazon which team you how to beat roulette. Are these good?

If there were a system for beating the house edge in roulette, I'm pretty sure that information would fit in one book. Roulette is not that complicated. All bets have the same house edge and the casino's advantage is significantly higher than it is in most other casino games (especially in the United States). No strategy increases your odds playing roulette, no matter what the advocates of progressive betting systems tell you. Roulette is not strategy-based, which is one reason casual gamblers like the game so much. John Patrick has written books on many forms of gambling: slots, craps, video poker, and Texas hold'em. When I tell you he wrote a book which suggests strategies exist for beating the slots, that should tell you all you need to know about the source.

Who manufactures roulette wheels?

The most successful roulette manufacturers in recent decades have been Cammegh, John Huxley, and Paul-Son Gaming Supplies. Cammegh and John Huxley are now owned by TCS, which now calls itself TCS John Huxley. TCS John Huxley has offices in Spain, Canada, Australia, Singapore, Nevada (USA), and South Africa. Paul-Son is owned by Gaming Partners International, which is based in France and has manufacturing plants in France and Mexico.

My number in baseball as a child was "9". If I bet on the "9" fifty times in a row and the ball has not landed on that number yet, what are the odds the ball lands on "9" on the 51st spin?

Ted Williams, the greatest ball player who ever lived, wore the number 9. Despite that fact, no two spins in roulette are connected. Whether the 9 has come up once, fifty times, or no times, this does not change the probability one bit. (Though I would check the machine if the same number came up 50 out of 50 times. I'd also check for Candid Camera.) On any given spin, the odds of the #9 coming up in American roulette are 1-in-38. On any given spin in European roulette, the odds of the #9 coming up are 1-in-37.

How many number slots are on a roulette wheel?

The American roulette wheel has 38 slots and the European wheel has 37. On the American wheel, an additional green double-zero (00) is included, which increases the house edge.

I know what four-number and six-number bets are named, but what is a five-number bet called?

The five-number bet is found in American roulette and it's called the "top line bet". This involves the 0, 1, 2, 3, and 00 numbers. This is the worst possible bet you can make in roulette, because it has a house edge of 7.9%. Never make a top line bet.

If I was to learn one roulette strategy tip, what should it be?

Chill out and enjoy the game. Roulette has no strategy to discuss. Combine that fact with the relatively slow rate of play and you have a game designed for relaxation. That's why so many casual gamblers play. Roulette is like taking the Lazy River at Hurricane Harbor--relax and enjoy the scenery. Hearkening back to the last question, if you want one real tip about betting in roulette, avoid the top line bet. The top line bet is the only wager with different odds than any other in the game, so avoid the 5-number wager in American roulette.

I read where the Martingale can beat the casino in the right circumstances and unlimited funds. Is that right?

Yes, but with unlimited funds, you could play the biggest progressive jackpot until you won. Having "unlimited funds" is an unrealistic assumption. The Martingale requires you to double your bet until you win. If you do, you go back to betting 1 unit. This means you'll win a little bit a whole lot of the time, then lose a ton every once in a while. Since unlimited funds suggest you keep betting until you win, that would be a winning strategy. In the Martingale, you lose ten wagers in a row and you're betting a thousand bucks at a time, which can bust the bankroll of most typical gamblers.

That's it for this installment of questions. I'll keep posting questions as this site gets them from readers. Keep the submissions coming and, until next time, keep playing single-zero online roulette.